How Cooke Town retains its old world charm

Years ago, Cooke Town was full of old bungalows built during the "burra sahib" days. Lots of garden space, verandahs with trellis panels, spacious bedrooms, high ceilings, four-blade punkahs, windows with framed-glass shutters…

I could go on and on and on.

But things are fast changing out here, with large bungalows making way for apartment blocks. Inevitable, with elderly couples living alone and their children settled abroad. But unlike elsewhere in the city, apartments here try and retain the old world charm associated with local British colonies – especially Cooke Town, Richards Town, Cox Town and Frazer Town.

The picture you see in this article is a good example of how the changing face of architecture retains some of the visual appeal of days gone by : picket fences, manicured gardens and a certain outdoor ambiance.

So, if you’re looking for an apartment that has some character and bearing, check out the properties in this part of town. It’s a whole new way of going down memory lane.

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