Beware of fraudulent practices at petrol bunks

Stay sharp. Get a receipt for anything you procure at the petrol bunks. Keep an eye on the actual amount of petrol/diesel you are getting. Check the bill thoroughly.

Almost all of us own a private vehicle, which means that we also visit petrol bunks frequently.

But how many of us are aware of the fraudulent practices happening at these bunks? And how many of us are able to take any action against them? 

A couple of months ago, I encountered a situation where I asked for Rs.500 worth of petrol, but got petrol worth Rs.200 instead. On questioning the employee, he said he had not heard it well and gave me petrol worth another Rs.300.

On switching on the ignition, I noticed that my indicator pointed well below what it should have shown. I told the guy that he had not put petrol for Rs 500 and that he better do so, before I escalated a complaint to his superiors or create a fiasco at the bunk in presence of other customers.

What I realised later, is that the Rs.200 initially shown to me was from the previous customer. I was distracted by another guy by my window side trying to sell me some loyalty card.

However, this is not the only instance. There have been several like this, when they tamper with the actual amount of petrol filled in your vehicle. To be safe, I now make sure I get a bill with my vehicle number on it and check every aspect of it.

Recently, I was tricked again, when I was given 1 litre less for the amount I had paid. Fortunately, I had the bill with me and the previous bills which showed how much petrol I should have actually got for that amount. This time, I complained to the owner and got back my amount. 

So what is the best way out of this? Complaining will of course, get you out of your situation. But I am thinking of several others who would have got tricked by these same fellows. I hardly ever see anyone taking a bill from them. So when they run out of petrol within a day of filling, they realise they have been fooled and have no way to get back their hard earned money.

My advise to you is to stay sharp. Get a receipt for anything you procure at the petrol bunks. Keep an eye on the actual amount of petrol/diesel you are getting. Check the bill thoroughly. If you are not careful, you will be the loser at the end of the day. 

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Comments:

  1. Usha Srinath says:

    This is a tricky one. When we ask for ‘full tank’, you get an odd number of liters, say 27. And that has to be multiplied by another odd number, say 79.44 per liter. Since it is difficult to multiply 27×79.44 in our heads, we tend to accept whatever number they give in the bill..as I was driving out, I kept feeling there was something odd about the bill, so I stopped just outside the pump and did the multiplication on paper. And they had charged me a few hundred rupees extra! It was quietly returned as soon as I claimed it.

  2. Hari Prasad Nadig says:

    Shell Petrol is probably much safer bet in Bangalore. The fuel from Shell lives up to the promises and they have better practices w.r.t filling and grabbing attention of the customer to the prior reading.

  3. keerthikumar says:

    The dealers also hand in hand with the delivery boys, again they keep goons to take care if any toward incident happens from customer side.The oil corporations and Weight and Measeurment department has to take intiative to safe guard the interest of consumers

  4. D R Prakash says:

    It is always “BUYER BEWARE” system. If you are not attentive, you become the victim. I use a petro card, get the slip and enter the reading (Reserve in 2 wheeler) and quantum filled on it to check the mileage, which also helps me to decide as to which bunk dispenses correct quantum of fuel.

    Certain modus adopted just seems to be accidental, but is done intentionally and they get through cheating in most of the cases, who are believing the persons at the bunk.

  5. Krishnaraj says:

    I agree with Hari Prasad Nadig. I had many such experiences in many of Indian Oil outlets. Now its been more than 3-4 years, I have completely stopped buying petrol form these outlets and always go to Shell. They are professional and I never had such incidents. Also one would see at least 2-3 km difference in millage and these days their price per liter is also in par with other PSU outlets.

  6. srinivas.s says:

    I AGREE WITH THE COMMENTS FROM THE CUSTOMERS IN THE PETROL BUNKS
    PEOPLE SHOULD BE CAREFUL WHILE PETROL IS BEING POURED INTO THE TANK’
    PEPOLE SHOULD NOTE DOWN THE READING ON THE PANEL BEFORE HE FILLS UP THE TANK. AS COMEENTED PEOLLE SHOULD ASK FOR THE bILL FOR THE QUANTITTY HE HAS FILLED PEOPLE SHOULD BE VERY CAREFUL WHEN THEY GO TO PETOLL STATION WHEN THERE IS HEAVY RUSH

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