Make sure it’s an ecofriendly Ganesha this year

Ganesha Chaturthi is still several weeks away (in mid-September), but sales of Ganesha idols have already begun. If you are accustomed to one of those colourful idols of the lord that more often than not end up polluting our lakes and waterbodies, this year you can do it differently. Look out for an ecofriendly Ganesha – one that will dissolve easily in water, and without toxic paints and non-recyclable paraphernalia.  

There are many places in Bangalore from where eco-Ganeshas can be ordered and bought. You can look up old collated lists on these links – 2013, 2014

Ashwini Prasad, a small entrepreneur-artist has been working with her hands for many years, making jewellery under the name Rajanya Designs. This year she is making clay idols (Ganeshas and Gowris) which will give devotees another eco-friendly option to the ones that have been available in previous years. Details below.   

 

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