Public Affairs Centre Colloquium on Citizen Voices in Environmental Governance

"With economic growth, development and climate change, how India decides to govern its environment in the age of rapid transitions is of paramount importance. How individuals, societies and the state confront the myriad trade-offs involved will determine the state of the environment we leave behind us." PAC Colloquium

Public Affairs Centre is organizing a colloquium on Citizen Voices in Environmental Governance on 23-24 August 2012, to explore how citizens can play a constructive role in promoting better environmental policy and governance in India. The venue is the Bangalore International Centre (TERI Complex) in Domlur, Bangalore. 

Policymakers, researchers, development experts, activists and committed individuals will be speaking at the colloquium (speakers and the schedule can be seen here) to share their views and experiences on the themes of the colloquium   – Laws, Regulations and Institurions on Environmental Governance in India – Climate Change: Policies, Debates and Local Initiatives – Influencing Environmental Policy in India. 

Usha Rajagopalan from PNLIT will be one of the speakers. Her presentation titled "Nurturing Puttenahalli Lake – A Case Study" will highlight how public-people partnership can achieve the seemingly impossible task of restoring a lake, making it a replicable model.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Similar Story

Bengaluru’s street vendors are the first to be impacted by climate change: Lekha Adavi

Lekha Adavi, member of AICTU, says the nature of street vending has changed in the city due to the impact of climate change.

(This is part 1 of the interview with Lekha Adavi on the impact of climate change on Bengaluru's street vendors) On May 1st, while the world celebrated Labour Day, Bengaluru recorded its highest temperature in 40 years. With temperatures continually on the rise, one of the most affected groups are street and peripatetic vendors (vendors who operate on foot or with push carts). In this interview, Lekha Adavi, member of the All India Centre of Trade Unions (AICTU), talks about the effect of climate change on street vendors. Excerpts: Lekha Adavi, member of the All India Centre of Trade Unions…

Similar Story

Smothered by smog: Struggle of vegetable vendors in Delhi’s Keshopur Mandi

Delhi's air pollution affects every resident, but for the urban poor, like vegetable vendors of Keshopur Mandi, it is much worse.

Halfway through our interview, vegetable vendor Rekha asked me point blank, “Isse kya hoga,” and at that moment, I could not think of an answer. She was right and had every reason to be hopeless. Much has been written about air pollution and much energy has been spent on expert committees and political debates and yet nothing has changed.  “Hum toh garib log hai, hum kisko jakar bole, hamari sunvai nahin hoti” (We are poor people, to whom do we go, nobody listens to us),” says Rekha Devi, who sells vegetables in the Keshopur Mandi. Keshopur is a large retail…